Jun 26, 2012

Handwriting Without Tears

This past school year Sara Madalin has been taught her alphabet using Mat Man and the Handwriting Without Tears curriculum. Every week they would learn to "build" a new letter using Mat Man. They also practiced drawing Mat Man to learn to draw the various shapes used to make letter. 

I wanted to continue to practice Mat Man and letters with her this summer. I stumbled upon this site through Pinterest and printed out the patterns and letters. We cut them out and made our own little version of Mat Man. She doesn't know the difference between our version and the real thing. Here she is one day last week after rest time when we were practicing her letters.

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She loves "doing the letters" and asks for us to practice them almost every day. We are also working on some fine motor activities in hopes of strengthening her handwriting skills. She's done quite a bit of tracing and dot-to-dot activities in the past couple weeks. Usually we spend about 30 minutes a day on those type activities, along with a story or two to go along with the letter we are focusing on on that particular day. We don't want all this school prep work to interfere too much with our swimming and other play time activities. 

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4 comments:

The Glenn Gang said...

I just heard about handwriting without tears yesterday. Jonah went way downhill after her broke his arm. His handwriting is worse than before Kindergarten. I'm gonna go check your link now.

Penny said...

That's too cute! I need that for my kindergarten class~ in Reading Centers. :)

Courtney said...

Great job working with her on this important skill. We use Handwriting without tears at our school in k and then as need in other grades for those students who are still struggling.

Penny said...

I went to the site and printed out the Lowercase set for my class. I have my class work on lowercase letters 90% of the time. That's the percentage uppercase letters are used in writing and reading. Only at the beginning of a sentence and on proper nouns. I never thought of that before I became a teacher, but now that I've corrected many Kindergarten children that came to me writing their names in all caps, I pass that info on. lol I tell pre-K parents if they want to teach their child to write their name before school to teach them in all lowercase. It's easier for me to teach them to capitalize that first letter, than to teach them to make the others lowercase. It's a habit by the time they get to me. Habits are hard to break. ;)